Category Archives: Games

Summertime and the Livin’ is Easy…

itc

 

I am quite happy to say that I have survived yet another Michigan winter. This winter was by far the worst in my memory, and I hope that it remains the worst that I will see in my lifetime. For now though, the snow is a distant memory and I am now looking ahead to another Michigan summer. When I think about summer, a lot of great memories come to mind; boating with my family, swimming with my sisters in the backyard pool, running around the neighborhood until the street lights came on and of course, summer camp.

Summer camp started off as a rocky experience for me. First, there was the fifth grade class camping trip where I was sent home early because the staff didn’t know how to handle my disability with the activities. Then, there was the time in seventh grade when I went to camp with a good friend. I was again excluded from several activities because of my Cerebral Palsy, plus reprimanded when I slept during free period because I was so exhausted from trying to keep up with the other kids. Luckily, both of those experiences ended on a happy note thanks to supportive friends and family; but it hadn’t left me eager to try summer camp again.

When I moved in with my dad in High School, I was once again faced with the prospect of summer camp. My Step-Mom insisted that my twin and I were both going, and there was really no arguing with my Step-Mom. She had been one of my biggest supporters during the 5th grade camp fiasco, so she had found a camp that was exclusively for people with physical disabilities. I would attend this camp for two weeks; I can’t say I was especially excited about the idea. I had been to similar camps before, usually the activities were geared toward kids much younger than myself and I had felt babied.

As it turned out, going to Indian Trails Camp was one of the best experiences of my life. The activities I was left out of at other camps, like archery, swimming and rope courses, were all adapted so that every camper was included. The beds and showers were accessible, the staff was mostly made up of first or second year college students, and they treated us like friends instead of clients.

Indian Trails Camp changed my life. It gave me the confidence to be just me and to embrace my disability, instead of trying to overcome it. It taught me how to adapt things to fit my needs and that with a few adjustment I could accomplish anything. Indian Trails Camp is where I had my first kiss and met my first boyfriend. It is where I made lifelong friends.  It is where I found acceptance and inclusion for the first time.

I know sometimes difficult experiences can turn us off to new things; but if you are from Michigan, have a disability and you’ve never gotten to experience summer camp, I encourage you to give Indian Trails Camp a try. It is never too late; there is even a camp for adults. Give yourself or your child a summer they will never forget.

Game Console Fitness

Because I am intrinsically lacking the “I love to work-out and sweat” gene, I am constantly searching for new options to keep me motivated. Time constraints, my lack of motivation as well as my limb loss combine to make working-out a chore.  I find that I am more apt, and hence more successful, when I am able to merge my working out with my daily activities.

Being the Mom to a little boy, my house is filled with game consoles and games. My husband and son can spend hours playing games and, although I am not a gamer, I have learned to appreciate their value. Not only do the games afford me a few moments of solitude, I discovered that I now have access to a wide library of work-out routines. A number of games incorporate enough movement to work up a sweat and to burn calories. After all, fitness doesn’t have to happen in a gym.

Active is an interactive program designed to move the player through a variety of work-outs. This basic fitness program has options to work sections of the body, or to run you through a whole body workout. Because of the ability to personalize, the player can eliminate the exercises which are difficult or painful. I find that I have to adjust many of the exercises to accommodate for my prosthesis, but it typically doesn’t seem to interfere with the work-out.

Dance Dance Revolution has received a lot of press in the past months. Despite it’s popularity, many lower extremity amputees find it frustrating with the constant impact on the residual limb becoming painful. This is a game that utilizes primarily foot movement in quick succession. Dancing ability, which I am admittedly lacking, is a requisite for this game. Although it looks fun, I had a difficult time with the pace, the impact and the pistoning within my socket as I tried to mimic the moves.

Just Dance, another physical game, only utilizes the hand controller. Foot options are demonstrated on the screen but are not required to score points. Lower extremity amputees are not at a disadvantage! Be careful, this game will have you working up a sweat in a song or two.

On days when I can’t walk outside, I have started turning to my XBox and Wii for an effective and fun fitness experience.

Real Time Web Analytics