Helping the Helper


imageI don’t spend a lot of time lamenting my amputation. I live a happy and healthy life and, for the most part, adapting to the limb loss has become second nature. Perhaps the only aspect of living with an amputation which I utterly detest is the sense of vulnerability. A fall, sore, blister, ingrown hair or a slew of other issues can pop up at a moments notice, rendering me unable to walk.

Last week I went to the doctor for my yearly limb check appointment. I knew that I was having some issues, but a I had hoped to thwart drastic treatment until my baby is a little older. Unfortunately the x-rays and exams revealed that the issues were more complex and involved than I realized. I emerged from the office with a handful of paperwork and a date for surgery.

Having surgery with a newborn is an exercise in planning and frustration. Ironically, I was put into the same situation after my first son was born eight years ago. I was hoping to avoid reliving the past, but it certainly did not turn out that way. After prepping the house and juggling schedules to secure care for both kiddos, I went to the hospital yesterday morning for my major limb revision surgery.

The procedure went well and, although I’m in considerable pain, I am expecting a smooth recovery. I’m already chomping at the bit to wear my prosthesis again. I have a feeling that the next month will feel extraordinarily long as I wait to heal enough to start wearing it.

Unlike my last post baby revision, this time I have more help. My older son is now eight and eager to be a helper. He loves fetching drinks, snacks, pillows and assorted electronic devices for me.

Although he is a great assistant, he is not necessarily the most careful. He tends to drop and spill, many times creating more of a mess for me. I’ve learned to take measures to counter his innate clumsiness. ¬†Sometimes having him help creates more work for me as I have to clean the spills etc..

I have even found some products which help to minimize my son’s propensity for dropping and spilling. When I ask him to fetch me some water, I know that a trail of drops will not be left by the liquid sloshing. During my recovery, and perhaps indefinitely I have been using a large insulated tumbler with lid and straw.

The cup keeps the liquids cold, and the straw makes it easier to drink from while lying in bed. The lid has saved copious amounts of water, juice and soda from spilling out as my little helper eagerly delivers it. When I am able to use my knee scooter again I am confident that I won’t create spills while wheeling around.

Recovering from surgery is always difficult. Adding a newborn to the mix simple adds to the frustration. Anytime I find a product, such as this insulated tumbler, that helps me I am appreciative.

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